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I call her:
"Real Deal All Steel"

1936
3 Win
Ford
330horsepower

0 Kms on the odometer
0 Hours of work
Awards

Owned for 0 Years

friends that 0 helped
5%
% of the week
I spend on my car
1%
Time I spend compared
to other entries
transmission
automatic
modified
yes

Vehicle Story:

The car was built in June of 1936 by Henry Ford’s crew and somehow it got to a Museum in Ottawa, where in 1987, they had an auction of unwanted vehicles. A fellowfrom the Ottawa area bought this car and took it home in its Desert Sand colour and itwas in immaculate condition. The car was taken apart for whatever reason and the owner lost interest.He sold it about a year later to a gentleman from Burlington, Ontario, who startedworking on it with his son. The owner of the car was a Captain in a local fire department,and during his time off, along with his son, they rebuilt the car from ground up. Theyspent many hours on boxing the frame, getting rid of the original drive line, replacing itwith a more modern engine and transmission, not to mention independent frontsuspension and 9” Ford Rear axle. The body was modified by removing the tarred roof and fitting sheet metal into the opening, and it was so precise that a minimal amount of filler was used. As a matter of fact, there is hardly any filler on the entire body. The door handles were shaved and holes filled. The car was stripped down to the metal, primed, and painted Blue. They assembled it and took it to a few cruise nights, but they were not happy with the colour. The car was taken apart again and painted Executive Black by “Dave’s Paint Shop”, St. Catharines, Ontario, in 1993. Once painted, the car was brought home for reassemble when tragedy struck. A horrific and fatal accident occurred involving the son, of the Fire Captain, who passed away of his injuries in a motor vehicle accident. All interest was lost in rebuilding the car. It sat in his garage for many years unfinished and untouched. In October 2005, I sold my 1939 Ford 2 Door Sedan to a Fire Captain who asked me what I was hoping to buy as my next car. I had always wanted a 1936 Ford 3 Window Coupe and his reply was, “I know where there is one and I am pretty sure the guy would sell it, and I will find out for you, as we work together”. I was pretty quick in replying to him that I was sure it was probably a 5 Window Coupe. Nevertheless, my wife and I went to Burlington, and it was in a small garage, pieces all over the place, covered in dust, but it was what I had always wanted, a very straight, black 3 window coupe, all steel, and all there. I immediately said I would take the car, and that I would be back with the money and a trailer. I got the money and paid him immediately, but I couldn’t find a trailer to borrow, so I told him I would be back in a week or two. Well, I got a phone call from the owner saying to forget the deal within that two week period, as his family, including his 93 year old father, said please do not sell the car. The family could not part with the car as they missed their son, grandson, and brother who had helped build the car and they felt they would have nothing left if they sold it. I agreed to meet the owner in Vineland, Ontario, where he gave me my money back, and I truly understood the family wishes. As a Fire Captain myself, I could see the traumatic stress they were under. I asked if they would keep my name and number and if they were to decide to sell it, I would be there with money in hand and a trailer to pick it up. Well, I waited for another 3 years! I showed up with the money and trailer, the first week of December 2008, and loaded up the body and frame first, and filled the trailer with the rest of the parts. Lots of parts! As we were doing this, the owner’s wife, and daughter came home, and the daughter was all upset that she would not have the car for her wedding day. I asked her when the wedding was, and it was a few years off, so I promised her that I would return the car when she was ready. She said that I probably would not do that, and I told her to tell her Dad to call me when they had a wedding date. She said ok. We started the assembly, immediately making changes along the way with the help of some great friends. The interior was completed by Miller Upholstery of Fenwick, Ont., done in a flat black leather look with billet seat buttons. The windows are all power, including the rear, and the windshield still cranks out by hand as it did in 1936. The engine is a 400 cu. inch, and fully dressed with a 200R4 transmission. Up front is a tubular Mustang ll set up with coil overs and the rear is a Ford 9” with 3:73 Gears. The wheels were changed to 17” up front and 18” on the rear. We changed some of the wiring and put in a new fuse panel to include remote controlled rumble seat lid and power door openers. A couple of years went by with changes along the way. We had plans to attend an event in the USA with a group of hot rod enthusiasts when we received a phone call from the previous owner. He asked if he could have the car for his daughter’s wedding. He gave me the date, and I took the car back to Burlington for the father of the Bride. He had the car from Thursday to Tuesday, and they could not believe that I gave them the car for that long of a period of time. So, now it is the wedding day and Dad is taking the Bride to the Church for her vows. It was a sunny day and as they approached the Church, a beam of sunlight came between them. They felt really good about this as perhaps the son and brother of the pair who helped work on the car was riding with them all the way. At the wedding reception, the bride’s father, in his speech, stated that there is a bond of brotherhood between firefighters, and he knew that it was that bond that made me keep my promise to him and his family. Having the car for this special occasion was certainly deserved, and I could not have broken my promise to her. The bride sent me a Thank You note and part of what she had to say about the drive to the church was this...”I looked at my dad and it was all so wonderful. Thank you for making this happen for me. It was the best day of all our lives!!” This car has been driven to Vermont, Massachusetts, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, PEI, the Atlantic Nationals, Syracuse, New York Nationals, Louisville, Kentucky, Kalamazoo, Michigan and many car shows, cruise nights in Ontario, the USA, and still has the 23 year old paint!

Real Deal All Steel

Ford 3 Win
1936
330HP

I call her:
"1930 Model A"

1930
5 Win
Ford
300horsepower

0 Kms on the odometer
0 Hours of work
Awards

Owned for 0 Years

friends that 0 helped
20%
% of the week
I spend on my car
4%
Time I spend compared
to other entries
transmission
automatic
modified
yes

Vehicle Story:

1930 Ford Coupe Hot Rod History As a young boy I assembled a lot of model car kits. As with most of us, when I left home, I left the models, which my parents carefully packed into cardboard boxes. Many years later, when I was visiting, my mother said, “you are now taking all of them to your home.” I got rid of all but one, which was a Monogram kit, 1932, chopped, and channeled red Ford hot rod coupe. I always loved the look of this little car. I still have it. I knew one day that I would build a hot rod coupe to look like it. My car dreams had to be put on hold for many years, as work and home ate up most of my time until the ‘90’s, when I was finally able to get into the old car hobby. I bought, built, sold, and traded a few cars, but was never able to find a decent affordable ’32 Ford 5 window coupe. I eventually retired, and set myself a goal to build a few old cars. The first would be the hot rod coupe similar to that old red model, which was still on my shelf, and in my head, all these years. I still could not find an affordable steel ’32 Ford coupe. I did find a very complete, decent, and never messed with, 1930 Model A Ford coupe, and decided it would be my hot rod. What I wanted to end up with, was a nostalgia appearing car that looked like it could have been built in the late ‘50’s or early ‘60’s, but with a few modern safety features. I studied the old small hot rod magazines from that era, which I had collected, when I was a kid. (the ones with the black and white pages) I wanted to do as much as possible myself, in my home shop, but also wanted a real good basis to start with, which to me was a good straight frame, which Paul Horton fabricated for me in his frame jig. I spent 3 years building this car, and a lot more years collecting the parts I used. All of it was, as they say “a labour of love.” I never had a bad day in my shop even when things didn’t go the way I wanted. The tubing frame is kicked up 7” in the rear, with an 8” Maverick rear end, and a 4 bar, with adjustable coilovers. The front is a dropped I beam axle, with ’48 Ford car spindles, adapted to disc brakes, and pete and jakes hairpin radius rods. Steering is by the hot rod standard, a Vega box. The 1930 model A body, although in pretty good shape, still needed many patch panels welded in. I chopped the roof 4”, in filled the center roof opening with a 1965 mustang roof section, and channeled the body down 3” over the frame. The body is welded to a steel tubing sub frame with a steel floor, which is all bolted to the main frame. Most of the body wood was replaced with metal, but there is still some of the original 1930 wood, as well as some new wood. Once the body work was completed it was taken to Kerr Auto Body in Orillia, for final finishing and paint. Then the car was brought home, and everything was assembled for the final time. The engine is a GM crate 350, dressed to look like an older 327, complete with triple Rochester carbs and a lot of polished aluminum and stainless. I also did my own polishing. Transmission is a 350 turbo, with a mild shift kit installed and a Lokar shifter. The rims are steel, 15x6” on the front, and 15x8” reversed on the rears, both with baby moon caps. Tires are Diamondback radial wide whites. The seats are from an old CJ Jeep. The upholstery work was done by Rod Akey, of Old School Klassics in Ravenshoe. I installed an old flea market Ford truck heater case and core, with a 12 volt computer fan behind it, to take the chill off on cool nights. The subtle pinstriping was added by my friend Paul Lapp. The car has been on the road for 3 summers, goes down the road straight, stops quick and straight, and is a blast to drive. Although I go to a few shows and cruise nights, mainly for the social aspect, and the great people I meet, it was built to drive and enjoy. And I do

1930 Model A

Ford 5 Win
1930
300HP
VS
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